Isnt it ironic that some people look more "american" and do not speak english while others look mexican and do?

I was just thinking how wrong sometimes we americans are about ourselves, I just went down to Mexico on a business trip and i stayed with a Mexican family in a upper-class neighbourhood, and it was new to me to see that there are actually many white mexicans some of them even blonde but they are 100%mexican citizens some of them do not even speak english, on the other hand it is not rare to see in the US speacially in the southern states "mexican-looking people" and some of them are 5th generation mexicans and lost completely the language and they speak English and some of them know nothing of Spanish…I know that race and nationality have nothing to do with each other (specially in America) but still it made me think of stereotypes and how wrong we can be….any similar stories???

7 Comments

  1. Yes. My daughter, who is 3/4 Japanese, was constantly asked by the hicks at her school if she was an ESL (English as a second language) student even though her English level is superior to the average American student. Also, when we were in line at customs after returning to the US from a trip abroad, a guy said "everyone with a US passport stand in this line, everybody else go to the other line." We were in the US line since we’re Americans, but immediately all these white people cut in front of us, assuming we were foreign.

    Lego Indy
  2. well duh

    im mexican and people confuse me for being white.

    my mother’s side has blue/green eyes and white skin, but they are all from mexico.

    being mexican doesnt always mean you are short and brown.

    GHOULINA
  3. My boyfriend is a Spanish looking Mexican, lightly brown, and he told me where he’s from, he’s dark. (he’s not even dark for california!)
    However, I work with a guy, illegal immigrant, light brown hair, blue eyes, freckled skin. We only speak Spanish together, and customers are always trying to talk to him, he just smiles and tells them (in English, thick accent) that he doesn’t understand them. When they try to talk more, he just repeats it. It’s adorable.

    *Ustedes necesitan comprender que la pregunta es de una persona que se da cuenta que podemos mirar diferente en un pais.

    Rachelita
  4. Ok, you need to learn about Latin American history and Colonialism, period.

    Ok, so first there were Native Americans, and then Europeans came and brought African slaves. So, some Europeans mated with the Native Americans and created the large mestizo race that is now present in Latin American. Some Europeans did not mate with the Natives or have recently migrated to Latin America(Jews fleeing from Europe, Eastern European fleeing from wars, etc.) So yes, there are Latin Americans that are not mixed and that look European. Mexican is a nationality and not a race…not everyone is mestizo or Native American and this applies to every Latin American country. And yes, it is a common stereotype among most people because people are just ignorant and need to get educated. White does not mean English speaker, it means European origin/heredity.

    PopeDARWIN™
  5. You do not consider people like that,a native of a country can only speak his own language, and could speak English as well, if he was taught it when he were at school. If foreign people speak English while they live in America,that is good ,Obama had said some thing about this issue,we will see that linguistic teaching will be a part of the curriculum of schools colleges and universities

    Emmanuel M
  6. this kind of white people in mexico doesn’t look american, they look more like european, because have european ancestors like Italians, Spaniards,french, Germans and British.

    ramses
  7. Several years back, when Americans were stressing about Japan buying us out and taking us over, I heard some out-of-town guys talking loudly and complaining bitterly about it, and they pointed out a local company as an example of how bad it was getting. I stuck my nose in it and told them (truthfully) that the owners of that particular company had been here for three generations and had children and one grandchild here as well. I asked them how many generations of a family had to be born, raised, schooled, and bred here to qualify as Americans. I further asked them how, in a country whose people are from diverse national origins, it was possible to tell from a surname alone whether or not someone was American. Ticks me off, that kind of nonsense.

    #7

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